カリフォルニア大学、イリノイ大学など 海外大学との提携を締結

情報経営イノベーション専門職大学(東京都墨田区、学長 中村伊知哉、http://www.i-u.ac.jp、以下「iU」)は、このほど海外大学との提携の第一段階として、米国カリフォルニア大学サン・ディエゴ校(The University of California, San Diego (UCSD)、米国イリノイ大学シカゴ校(The University of Illinois at Chicago Campus)、英国シェーフィールド大学(The University of Sheffield)、マレーシアラッフルズ大学(Raffles University Malaysia )、シンガポール国立大学(National University of Singapore)、英国ニコラ・テスラ大学院大学 (Nikola Tesla Graduate School)、アフリカアクレ連邦技術大学(The Federal University of Technology、Akure、 Ondo State、 Nigeria: FUTA)の7校との包括的提携に合意しました。

世界大学構想について

iUは今後も国内外の主要大学と積極的に提携し、iUを中心とした、ITとビジネスの世界に向けての、知的ハブとしての世界大学、「世界大学構想」の実現を目指します。
具体的には学生、教員の交流や、共同研究の実施に加え、以下を目的としています。
(1) 提携大学での授業が受けられ、卒業単位として認められるパスポート制度
(2) 戦略特区の共同利用による新産業、新製品の共同開発研究
(3) 海外留学生へのビザ特区の設置
(4) その他eスポーツ、超教育、超スポーツ、アニメ、オタクなどの国際的共同研究
(5) 起業支援、及び人材育成

今後について

今般の海外大学との提携は、iUが提唱する「世界大学構想」の一貫として推進します。
各校との提携により、今後iUは、それぞれの大学の学生及び教員の交流を通じ、国際的共同講義の開発・開催、各種IT技術に関する国際共同実験・実装、そして国際的共同研究などを、各大学と、またこの活動を支援する内外著名企業各社とともに、展開してまいります。

<大学概要>

■大学・学部学科名
・大学名:「情報経営イノベーション専門職大学」 ※愛称「iU(あいゆー)」
・学部名:情報経営イノベーション学部 情報経営イノベーション学科

■学長 

中村伊知哉(なかむらいちや)
<職歴>
1984年、ロックバンド少年ナイフのディレクターを経て旧郵政省入省
1998年、MITメディアラボ客員教授
2002年、スタンフォード日本センター研究所長
2006年、慶應義塾大学大学院教授
2020年4月より、情報経営イノベーション専門職大学学長に就任

■設置概要
・本校舎:東京都墨田区文花1-18-13
・サテライトオフィス:東京都港区海岸1-7-1 東京ポートシティ竹芝 オフィスタワー8階・学生数:1期生230名
・専任教員数:28名

■教育理念
「変化を楽しみ、自ら学び、革新を創造する。」

■基本構想
ICT×ビジネス×グローバルコミュニケーション + 全員インターンシップ×全員起業×オンライン学習
・ICT教育:電子学園が積み上げた基盤により、プログラミング・AI・ビッグデータなど、幅広いICTスキル教育を展開
・ビジネス創造教育:実務家教員によるビジネススキル教育を実施、ビジネス教養、ビジネスプラン策定力などを身につける
・使える英語・グローバル教育:国際舞台で仕事をするために必要な英語力を磨く教育と留学生の受け入れにより国際性も強化
・インターンシップとリアルプロジェクト:1人640時間のインターン、実ビジネスの中でハンズオンのリアルプロジェクト教育を実施
・全員起業:希望者全員に対し、在学中に起業にチャレンジできるサポート体制
・オンラインを活用した授業サポート:『いつでもどこからでも学ぶことができる』をキーワードに、自ら積極的に学ぶための環境の充実

■育成人材像
・ICTを活用する様々な業界・団体において課題を解決し、新たな商品・サービスやビジネスを生み出すことのできる人材
・ICTを活用し新たな商品・サービスやビジネスを生み出すことで、国際社会と地域社会の産業発展に貢献する起業家

【本リリースに関するお問い合わせ先】

iU 情報経営イノベーション専門職大学 TEL:03-5655-15555  E-mail:info@i-u.ac.jp

iU announces partnership with 7 international universities.

Professional University of Information and Management for Innovation (Sumida-ku, Tokyo, President Ichiya Nakamura, http://www.iu.ac.jp, “iU”) announces that since opening the University on April 1st 2020, it already has reached a comprehensive partnership agreement with global seven prominent schools such as The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), The University of Sheffield, Raffles University Malaysia, National University of Singapore, Nikola Tesla Graduate School in UK, and the Federal University of Technology, Africa (Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria: FUTA). Many more international collaborations will follow.

iU will continue to actively collaborate with major universities in Japan and overseas, aiming to realize the “World University Concept”, a world university as an intellectual hub for the IT and business world centered around iU. While at the same time providing students the best opportunities to finance their careers so they can get the best student loan refinance opportunities.

Specifically, in addition to the exchange of students and faculty members and the implementation of joint research, the objectives are as follows:
(1) A “passport” system that allows classes at partner universities and is recognized as a graduation unit
(2) Joint development research of new industries and new products with joint use of strategic special zones
(3) Establishment of special visa zone for international students
(4) Other international collaborative research on eSports, super education, super sports, anime, otaku, etc.
(5) Entrepreneurship support and human resource development

This alliance with overseas universities is being promoted as part of the “World University Concept” advocated by iU. Through collaboration with each school, iU will be able to develop and hold international joint lectures, international joint experiments and implementation of various IT technologies, and international joint research through exchanges of students and teachers of each university. iU will work with universities and other well-known companies in Japan and overseas that support this activity.

Professor Adrian David Cheok AM awarded Order of Australia

The GOVERNOR GENERAL OF AUSTRALIA, Representative of Her Majesty the Queen Elizabeth II, has awarded AUSTRALIA’S highest honor the ORDER OF AUSTRALIA to Adrian David Cheok. It was announced by Queen Elizabeth on June 10th during the Queen’s Birthday Celebrations. Adrian David Cheok is awarded the prize for his contribution to international education and research. A brief bio of Adrian David Cheok follows:

Adrian David Cheok is Director of the Imagineering Institute, Malaysia, Full Professor at i-University Tokyo, Visiting Professor at Raffles University, Malaysia, Visiting Professor at University of Novi Sad-Serbia, on Technical faculty “Mihailo Pupin”, Serbia, Faculty of Ducere Business School, and CEO of Nikola Tesla Technologies Corporation.

He is Founder and Director of the Mixed Reality Lab, Singapore. He was formerly Professor of Pervasive Computing, University of London, Full Professor at Keio University, Graduate School of Media Design and Associate Professor in the National University of Singapore. He has previously worked in real-time systems, soft computing, and embedded computing in Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, Japan

These Researchers Want to Send Smells Over the Internet – Electrical stimulation of cells in the nasal passages produces sweet fragrances and chemical odors

By Eliza Strickland, 17 Oct 2018

https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/devices/these-researchers-want-to-send-smells-over-the-internet

 

These Researchers Want to Send Smells Over the Internet – Electrical stimulation of cells in the nasal passages produces sweet fragrances and chemical odors

A volunteer tries out a "digital smell" apparatus
Electrical stimulation of neurons high up in the nasal passages can cause people to perceive aromas that aren’t really there. Photo: Imagineering Institute

 

Imagine a virtual reality movie about the Civil War where you can smell the smoke from the soldiers’ rifles. Or an online dating site where the profiles are scented with perfume or cologne. Or an augmented reality app that lets you point your phone at a restaurant menu and sample the aroma of each dish.

The researchers who are working on “digital smell” are still a very long way from such applications—in part because their technology’s form factor leaves something to be desired. Right now, catching a whiff of the future means sticking a cable up your nose, so electrodes can make contact with neurons deep in the nasal passages. But they’ve got some ideas for improvements.

This digital smell research is led by Kasun Karunanayaka, a senior research fellow at the Imagineering Institute in Malaysia. He started the project as a Ph.D. student with Adrian Cheok, now director of the institute and a professor at the City University of London, who’s on a quest to create a “multisensory Internet.” In one of Cheok’s earliest projects he sent hugs to chickens, and his students have also worked with digital kisses and electric taste.

 

Karunanayaka says most prior experiments with digital smell have involved chemical cartridges in devices that attach to computers or phones; sending a command to the device triggers the release of substances, which mix together to produce an odor.

Working in that chemical realm, Karunanayaka’s team is collaborating with a Japanese startup called Scentee that he says is developing “the world’s first smartphone gadget that can produce smell sensations.” They’re working together on a Scentee app that integrates with other apps to add smells to various smartphone functions. For example, the app could link to your morning alarm to get the day started with the smell of coffee, or could add fragrances to texts so that messages from different friends come with distinct aromas.

But Karunanayaka’s team wanted to find an alternative to chemical devices with cartridges that require refilling. They wanted to send smells with electricity alone.

For his experiments, he convinced 31 volunteers to let him stick a thin and flexible cable up their noses. The cable was tipped with both a tiny camera and silver electrodes at its tip. The camera helped researchers navigate the nasal passages, enabling them to bring the electrodes into contact with olfactory epithelium cells that lie about 7 centimeters above and behind the nostrils. These cells send information up the olfactory nerve to the brain.

Typically, these olfactory cells are stimulated by chemical compounds that bind to cell receptors. Instead, Karunanayaka’s team zapped them with an electric current.

 

The digital smell apparatus includes a controller and a cable with a camera and electrodes on the tip

The researchers had previously combed the scientific literature [PDF] for examples of electrical stimulation of nasal cells, and found some reports that the stimulation caused test subjects to perceive odors. So they decided to experiment with different parameters of stimulation, altering both the amount and frequency of the current, until they found the settings that most reliably produced smell sensations.

The subjects most often perceived odors they described as fragrant or chemical. Some people also reported smells that they described as fruity, sweet, toasted minty, or woody.

This experiment was a very basic proof-of-concept, Karunanayaka says. The next step is to determine whether certain stimulation parameters are reliably linked to certain smells. He must also investigate how much variability there is between subjects. “There may be differences due to age, gender, and human anatomy,” he says.

The biggest question, however, is whether he can find a way to produce these ghostly aromas without sticking a tube up people’s noses. The experiments were very uncomfortable for most of the volunteers, Karunanayaka admits: “A lot of people wanted to participate, but after one trial they left, because they couldn’t bear it.”

The digital smell experiment setup

Two possible solutions suggest themselves, Karunanayaka says: They could make the insert smaller, more flexible, and less unbearable. Or they could skip past the nose’s olfactory cells and directly stimulate the brain.

As a step toward that neurotech goal, the Imagineering Institute researchers are planning a brain-scanning collaboration with Thomas Hummel, a leading expert in smell disorders at the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany. In the planned experiment, volunteers will both smell real odiferous objects, such as a rose, and also receive nasal stimulation. All these sniffs will take place while the volunteers are getting their brains scanned by a noninvasive method such as fMRI.

“We’ll see which areas in the brain are activated in each condition, and then compare the two patterns of activity,” Karunanayaka says. “Are they activating the same areas of the brain?” If so, that brain region could become the target for future research. Maybe the researchers could use a headset that provides a noninvasive form of stimulation to trigger that brain region, thus producing smell sensations without the need for either a rose or a nose-cable.

Such tech could serve a restorative purpose: People with smell disorders could theoretically wear some headgear to regain some smell functions. And for people with intact sniffer systems, it could provide enhancements: For example, VR headset makers could build in the brain-stimulating tech to provide users with a more immersive and richer sensory experience.