Invitation to Contribute to Special Issue “Love and Sex with Robots”

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I recently accepted an invitation to serve as the Guest Editor for a Special Issue of the journal Multimodal Technologies and Interaction on the subject of “Love and Sex with Robots”. It is my pleasure to invite all researchers to submit an article on this topic.

The article may be either a full paper or a communication based on your own research in this area, or may be a focused review article on some aspect of the subject. MTI is an open access, peer-reviewed journal, edited by Professor Adrian David Cheok. You will not be required to pay the usual publication fee (Article Processing Charge) in the first issue of this journal.

All submissions will be subject to peer review. If you plan to submit a review article please provide me with a title and brief description at your earliest convenience, in order to avoid multiple reviews covering the same material.

For more information about the Special Issue, please see: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/mti/special_issues/robots

For information on manuscript preparation and related matters, please see the instructions for authors: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/mti/instructions

Although the deadline for submission of manuscripts to the Special Issue is 1 October 2016, I would appreciate hearing from you in the next few weeks whether you would be willing to submit a contribution.

I saw the weird and it was at the MRS 2016 National Conference

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Posted by: Annie Pettit on 21 March 2016

I go to enough market research conferences to have seen pretty much every technology for running questionnaires. I’ve seen virtual reality and Google Glasses and all things cool. But the MRSlive conference in London was my very first introduction to the weird and wonderful world of virtual taste, smell, hugs, and kisses. Yes, you read that right.

I stopped by a booth managed by Emma Yann Zhang, a PhD student at the Department of Computer Science at the City University London. She had some pretty awesome stuff to showcase.

kissesAnyone who is a fan of The Big Bang television show will know about the kissing machine that Raj and Howard so weirdly tried out on each other.

But this device is indeed available. Simply press your lips to the white section of the device and your lip motions will be transferred to the person on the other end. The most obvious use for this technology is, of course, as a kissing machine for long distance relationships. Kissing Gramma and Grampa good night will bring warm fuzzies to anyone but what about more commercial opportunities? Imagine being able to shop online and feel the fabric of the shirt or the smoothness of the flooring you’re thinking of buying.

smellNeed more weird? How about a device that lets you digitally transmit smells? This device is currently available for sale on Amazon, and it lets you choose a predetermined scent from your smartphone and have that scent be released from someone else’s smartphone. Chemicals are contained within the white ‘balloon’ and the cartridge would have to be periodically replaced.

Aside from hilariously sending your friends every bad and gross smell you can think of, companies could test new perfumes and colognes, scents of cleaning products, scents of food and beverages, and more to determine which scents are most consumer friendly. And they could test these scents with anyone anywhere in the world without bringing them together in a central location.

hugsAre you feeling blue? Maybe you could a little hug send from this hugging ring. This device is still a prototype but it currently works with haptic technology to give your finger a little buzz anytime your significant other sends one from their smartphone, similar to how your fitness devices buzzes on your write. Right now, it’s a ring but imagine a future where it’s a bracelet or a necklace or a belt.

And once again you can imagine all that could come from it. Perfectly, individually designed massage clothing. I am so in for that!

tasteAnd lastly, but not necessarily most weirdly is a digital tasting device. Simply clip the silver metal section to the end of your tongue and it will deliver electrical currents that replicate certain tastes. Once again, the implications are impressive. Imagine creating flavors for innumerable new food and beverages without actually making the recipes thirty or forty times. Make one recipe of lasagna and then digitally manipulate the variables. Add a little more salt, less salt, more pepper, more oregano, more basil, more celery. Try out every possible minute flavour difference until you find the one that your target group of consumers loves the most. And once again, your target group could be anyone, anywhere in the world.

This technology fascinates me. Today, it is weird and wonderful and cutting edge. It doesn’t always seem relevant to the market research industry until you take the time to brainstorm the potential applications. Ten years from now, just like we do with mobile phones, we will chuckle at how old-fashioned and clunky it is.

For now, I’ll continue to be really impressed. How cool is this stuff!

Source: http://web.peanutlabs.com/i-saw-the-weird-and-it-was-at-the-mrs-2016-national-conference-mrslive-mrx-newmr/

Adrian David Cheok Editor-in-Chief of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction Journal

Adrian David Cheok has been invited to be the Editor-in-Chief of the new journal Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (MTI). 

About MTI

Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088) is an international, multi/interdisciplinary, open access, peer-reviewed journal which publishes original articles, critical reviews, research notes, and short communications on this subject. MTI focuses on fundamental and applied research dealing with all kinds of technologies that can acquire and/or reproduce unimodal and multimodal digital content that supports interaction (e.g. human–computer, human–robot and animal–computer). Such technologies may produce visual, tactile, sonic, taste, smell, flavor or any other kind of content that can enrich consumer/user experience.

Our aim is to encourage scientists to publish experimental, theoretical and computational results in as much detail as possible, so that results can be easily reproduced. There is, therefore, no restriction on the length of the papers.

Scope
  • displays/sensors: visual, tactile/haptic, sonic, taste, smell
  • multimodal interaction, interfaces, and communication
  • human–computer and human–robot relations and interaction
  • animal–computer interaction
  • human factors, cognition
  • multimodal perception
  • smart wearable technology
  • psychology and neuroscience
  • digital and sensory marketing
  • enabling, disruptive technologies
  • multimodal science, technology and interfaces
  • theoretical, social and cultural issues
  • design and evaluation
  • content creation, environments processes and methods
  • application domains

For more information or to submit your manuscript to this journal, visit this link http://www.mdpi.com/journal/mti.

Science Museum Exhibition – Cravings: Can your food control you?

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Find out how the food you eat affects your body, brain and eating-habits. See our electric taste interface exhibited in the Cravings exhibition at London’s Science Museum! Free Entry.

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What drives your desires for the foods you love? Is it the colour of your spoon, the food your mum ate while pregnant, the trillions of bacteria that dine with you, or the little known ‘second brain’ in your gut?

From the flavours you learned to love in the womb, to the very next bite you take, your appetite has been shaped by food. Through personal stories, fascinating objects and cutting-edge science and technology, explore how food affects your body, brain and eating habits.

Visit Cravings in our Antenna gallery to:

  • See an artificial gut whirring away.
  • Take part in a real experiment on flavour perception.
  • Touch some 3D-printed mice, sniff a scientific smell kit, and ‘chew’ some ‘bread’ in our interactive displays.
  • Play Craving Commander and express your opinion on how we can get raging cravings under control. Should we ban cake except on birthdays? Use smart refrigerators that police what we eat? You decide in this fast-paced game.
  • Discover unconventional dining utensils designed by scientists and chefs to trick our sense of taste.
  • Find out if scientists think we ‘eat with our eyes’ and if we can be ‘addicted’ to food.

 

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/visitmuseum/Plan_your_visit/exhibitions/cravings.aspx